Here’s the Drug Trump Uses to Treat Male Pattern Baldness

Two weeks ago, White House physician Ronny Jackson issued a highly anticipated statement on President Donald Trumps health following a complete physical exam. Trump, Jackson claimed, is in excellent health with no concern of physical or cognitive decline.

Jackson also revealed that, in addition to cholesterol medication and a multivitamin, the president pops the oral supplement finasteride (often sold as the brands Propecia, Propecia Pro-Pak, and Proscar) to treat male-pattern baldness. While the use of finasteride to help prevent male-pattern baldness is not newit was first approved for treating prostate enlargement in 1992 before being rebranded and sold in 1997 as a hair-loss drugit has come under fire in recent years for its supposed extreme side effects. In 2015, Merck, the drugs manufacturer, was hit with multiple class-action lawsuits alleging the drug caused severe sexual and emotional side effects.

According to Dr. Nikki Hill, a board-certified dermatologist and hair-loss specialist based in Tucker, Georgia, using finasteride in FDA-approved doses (1 milligram) is not harmful for the vast majority of her patients.

About 2 percent of men in their twenties have sexual side effects, Hill told The Daily Beast. Occasionally, Hills patients will report decreased sperm volume after taking the drug and sometimes even bouts of depressionbut that side effect is thankfully rare, Hill says. Ive had maybe three people in six years tell me that they feel a little more depressed, but they dont know if its circumstantial or due to taking the medicine. I end up taking them off it [if they report depression] just to make sure. The FDA lists depression as a possible side effect of finasteride on its website (PDF).

Finasteride works by blocking an enzyme that converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, or DHT. Paradoxically, DHT is the hormone responsible for sexual function and hair growth earlier in life. But as men age and their testosterone decreases, an imbalance of testosterone and DHT can actually cause hair follicles to shrink, inhibiting new hair growth.

In the past few years, however, a growing number of patients are reporting severe neurological side effects after taking finasteride so many that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognizes Post-Finasteride Syndrome on their list of genetic and rare diseases. Patients suffering from so-called Post-Finasteride Syndrome have reported mental and neurological side effects, like depression, suicidal ideation, anxiety, and impaired memory, and have reported such symptoms even after several months of discontinuing the drug. But these claims make little sense to most dermatologists.

Finasteride has a very short half-life, said Dr. Nicole Rogers, a board-certified dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University. The drug is fully metabolized within a week, so for people with Post-Finasteride Syndrome to be reporting decreased libido and brain fog, and having it continue despite stopping the drugfrom a neurological perspective, we dont really understand why that would be.

According to Rogers, finasteride is one of the most potent drugs on the market, and only one of two FDA-approved methods for hair loss (minoxidil, or Rogaine, being the other). While Rogaine needs to be applied to the hairline topically, finasteride is generally taken as an oral medication, which patients prefer since Rogaine can leave them looking greasy. Whats more, finasteride is typically much more effective. It can be a miracle medicine for people who take it, said Rogers, though she cautions that if patients are already prone to anxiety, depression, or have a family history of erectile dysfunction, this may not be the treatment for them.

In addition to possible sexual and neurological side effects, increasing the risk of high-grade prostate cancer may also be a concern.

Nobody who has a strong family history of prostate cancer should go on this medicine, Hill said. And if they do, they need to be closely monitored. According to Hill, doctors are able to screen patients for prostate cancer by checking the level of a chemical called PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, in the bloodstream. Finasteride, however, has been shown to artificially lower the numbereven when prostate cancer is present.

If youre taking finasteride, let your doctor know, and have digital rectal exams to assess prostate cancer, rather than a blood test, Hill suggested. If theres a family history of prostate cancer in my patients, I find other alternatives [to finasteride] because theyll be tested at a younger age, and their PSA levels are very important.

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/trumps-male-pattern-baldness-drugdemystified

Prostate cancer trial stuns researchers: ‘It’s a once in a career feeling’

Study with powerful results finds that combining two existing therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37%

Combining two existing prostate cancer therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37%, according to a study presented at the worlds largest cancer conference. The new findings could change how doctors first approach treatment of prostate cancer.

These are the most powerful results Ive seen from a prostate cancer trial, said Nicholas James, the lead author of the abstract presented as the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Its a once in a career feeling. This is one of the biggest reductions in death Ive seen in any clinical trial for adult cancers.

Researchers combined standard hormone therapy with a drug called abiraterone , which is typically used only for cancer patients whose disease has stopped responding to standard hormone therapy. The research was conducted as part of the Stampede trial, an ongoing randomized trial conducted in the UK and Switzerland.

Abiraterone not only prolonged life, but also lowered the chance of relapse by 70% and reduced the chance of serious bone complications by 50%, James said. Based on the magnitude of clinical benefit, we believe the upfront care for patients newly diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer should change.

The study looked at a group of 2,000 men. Patients who received both abiraterone and normal hormone therapy were significantly less likely to die, compared to patients who received only hormone therapy.

Comparatively, 83% of men assigned abiraterone therapy survived versus 76% of men on standard hormone therapy. Researchers also found that patients who received both medications had slightly stronger side effects, especially cardiovascular and liver problems.

One patient who participated in the trial, Alfred Samuels, 59, was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in January 2012. It felt like my world fell apart overnight, Samuels said. The doctors explained that surgery wasnt an option for me because the cancer had spread beyond my prostate.

As part of the trial, I started taking abiraterone four times a day and had a hormone injection every eight weeks, he said. During the first six months, tests showed that the treatment was working. Im still on the trial, which I find reassuring and, fortunately, my cancer is being managed well.

More than 27,000 men in the US and 11,000 men in the UK die of prostate cancer each year, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prostate Cancer UK. In the US, aside from skin cancer, it is the most common cancer in men.

The potential benefits of giving some men abiraterone alongside hormone therapy are clearly impressive and we will be working with all relevant bodies to make sure this treatment becomes an option available for these men via the NHS, said Dr Iain Frame, director of research at Prostate Cancer UK.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jun/03/prostate-cancer-therapy-study-abiraterone

Men Dont Realize The Sexual Dysfunction Risks Of Prostate Surgery

Reuters Health – Men with sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer surgery are often surprised to learn that the surgery had put them at risk for those problems, a new study finds.

The men in the study had come to a sexual health clinic because of problems they were having after removal of a cancerous prostate gland. Researchers who quizzed them about the sexual function information they had received preoperatively found that the men had “largely unrealistic expectations” about their sexual health after the surgery, like whether they’d be able to achieve erections.

“I think this data is some of the first to report what we see in the clinic,” said Dr. Joshua Meeks, a urologist affiliated with the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Men with prostate cancer have several treatment options, which include active surveillance, radiation and removing the gland altogether. All have potential side effects, according to senior study author Dr. John P. Mullhall and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

As reported in BJU International, Mulhall and colleagues surveyed 336 men with sexual dysfunction roughly three months after a prostate removal operation known as a radical prostatectomy. About two-thirds of the group had traditional open surgery; the rest had robotic-assisted surgery.

The average age was 64. Most of the men – about 88 percent of open surgery and 91 percent of robotic surgery patients – said they’d been able to have sex before surgery.

But only 38 percent knew whether they’d had nerve sparing surgery, which helps preserves sexual function. And only half of the patients realized the surgery would take away their ability to ejaculate.

Less than 10 percent knew their penis length might decrease after surgery.

Few men in either group were aware of the potential for changes in orgasms and pain or incontinence during orgasms.

The study didn’t analyze the information patients received from their doctors before the surgery, so the researchers can’t distinguish between what patients were told and what they remembered.

Still, the results show that some men may not retain information from their doctor about the risks of prostate removal, said Meeks, who was not involved with the new study.

“I think it really highlights why it’s important to have their spouse there, because I think having another set of ears is incredibly helpful,” he told Reuters Health.

Dr. Daniel Shoskes, a urologist at the Cleveland Clinic who also wasn’t involved in the study, told Reuters Health the conclusions fit with what his team has known for some time.

In fact, the Cleveland Clinic has started a half-day class for men undergoing prostate removal to educate them about the surgery and rehabilitation. The hope, said Shoskes, is that the classes will “have an impact on patient retention and satisfaction with the surgery.”

Shoskes, who also was not involved with the new research, added, “It is human and normal to forget what has been told to you. In some cases, it’s the surgeon that needs to do a better job” delivering the information.

The study’s lead author did not respond to a request for comment. In their paper, however, the study team also emphasizes the need to better prepare men for these operations. The study findings, they write, “should give us reason to think about our approach to the education of the patient prior to radical prostatectomy.”

Patients “are not remembering or appreciating the information the way that it is intended” and undertake the operation with mistaken expectations regarding their sexual health, they add.

SOURCE: bit.ly/1Ob43QJ BJU International, online December 21, 2015.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2016/01/07/side-effects-of-prostate-surgery_n_8930858.html

Prostate cancer trial stuns researchers: ‘It’s a once in a career feeling’

Study with powerful results finds that combining two existing therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37%

Combining two existing prostate cancer therapies could extend the life of men with advanced, high-risk prostate cancer by 37%, according to a study presented at the worlds largest cancer conference. The new findings could change how doctors first approach treatment of prostate cancer.

These are the most powerful results Ive seen from a prostate cancer trial, said Nicholas James, the lead author of the abstract presented as the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Its a once in a career feeling. This is one of the biggest reductions in death Ive seen in any clinical trial for adult cancers.

Researchers combined standard hormone therapy with a drug called abiraterone , which is typically used only for cancer patients whose disease has stopped responding to standard hormone therapy. The research was conducted as part of the Stampede trial, an ongoing randomized trial conducted in the UK and Switzerland.

Abiraterone not only prolonged life, but also lowered the chance of relapse by 70% and reduced the chance of serious bone complications by 50%, James said. Based on the magnitude of clinical benefit, we believe the upfront care for patients newly diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer should change.

The study looked at a group of 2,000 men. Patients who received both abiraterone and normal hormone therapy were significantly less likely to die, compared to patients who received only hormone therapy.

Comparatively, 83% of men assigned abiraterone therapy survived versus 76% of men on standard hormone therapy. Researchers also found that patients who received both medications had slightly stronger side effects, especially cardiovascular and liver problems.

One patient who participated in the trial, Alfred Samuels, 59, was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in January 2012. It felt like my world fell apart overnight, Samuels said. The doctors explained that surgery wasnt an option for me because the cancer had spread beyond my prostate.

As part of the trial, I started taking abiraterone four times a day and had a hormone injection every eight weeks, he said. During the first six months, tests showed that the treatment was working. Im still on the trial, which I find reassuring and, fortunately, my cancer is being managed well.

More than 27,000 men in the US and 11,000 men in the UK die of prostate cancer each year, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prostate Cancer UK. In the US, aside from skin cancer, it is the most common cancer in men.

The potential benefits of giving some men abiraterone alongside hormone therapy are clearly impressive and we will be working with all relevant bodies to make sure this treatment becomes an option available for these men via the NHS, said Dr Iain Frame, director of research at Prostate Cancer UK.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jun/03/prostate-cancer-therapy-study-abiraterone

Does Fatherhood Make Men Healthier?

With Fathers Day here yet again, its time to address the question on everyones mind: What is the health impact of being a father?

As with all critical questions relating to life and death, there is medical literature to help guide us. First, the epidemiologic: The proportion of adults who choose not to be parents is growing and sits at 20 percent or so. Most of the data is from women and for good reasonfemales have a shorter, more knowable duration of fertility. Plus they always know when they are a parent.

A guy, however, may impregnate and run, never knowing of the child he left behind (see: 1,001 traveling salesman and milkman jokes). Plus, he can remain potent a long while: Strom Thurmond fathered several children in his seventies while Saul Bellow last became a father at age 84.

Given the vagueness of the starting and stopping point for men, it is unsurprising that I could find no report that estimated the proportion of childless men. There is however a mature vocabulary for men and women alike: Childlessness can be voluntary or involuntary, has an upbeat newish namechild-freecountless blogs and spirited books, and a political slant around the notion that reproducing is somehow self-adoring and short-sighted.

The medical side of fatherhood (or its lack) has mostly focused on that group of men who are involuntarily fatherlessi.e., those who have tried but never successfully fathered children. The group that prefers not to procreate represents an unknowable proportion in the various studies but likely sits in the minority.

Various outcomes have been examined. These include cancer, heart disease, and overall mortality. Each article, though, carries the same extremely important caveat: The causal link between offspring number and medical condition is uncertain at best. Most investigators hypothesize that a subtle hormonal derangement such as too much or too little estrogen or androgen (the hormones involved in determining sexual characteristics) is known to affect the risk of heart disease and stroke and also may render a person less fertile. Therefore the medical problem and the childless state may be consequences of the same physiology and not a linear cause and effect.

Therefore, a well-performed study of more 137,000 men recruited to an AARP cohort found that married men who have no children have a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than men with two or more children, which might be explained by the fact that the same hormone imbalance that was reducing fertility also was increasing risk for cardiovascular disease. These authors, from leading institutions across the U.S., including Stanford and the National Cancer Institute, concluded that their findings agreed with more than a half-dozen similar studies finding an uptick in heart disease among the childless.

Ditto for prostate cancer, though in the other direction. Prostate cancer, like heart disease, appears related to subtle hormone imbalances; that is why the disease is often treated by using feminizing hormones. Several studies have sought to correlate risk of prostate cancer with number of offspring; most but not all show a lower risk among childless men. Perhaps, authors have speculated, the men who are not able to father because of a touch too much feminizing hormone are protected from some risk for prostate cancer risk by the same imbalance.

A large Danish study addressing these issues made quite a flurry at the end of 2012 (here, here, and here for example). Any study on population-based disease rates from Denmark should make the newsthey lead the world in well-performed, dispassionate, and statistically balanced inquiry.

This exploration found that, compared to the childless, the risk of premature mortality for those who had children was sharply reduced: Men with children had half the rate and women, one-fourth. The fine lines of the article (which were not so fine at all but loudly trumpeted) were not read carefully by some. Thankfully, a watchdog group of unskewers at the Science Media Centre examined the actual facts. The group studied was an altogether skewed collection of 21,276 Danish couples who had sought help in an infertility clinic. The researchers then compared the health outcomes of those who successfully did or did not successfully become pregnantand the difference in rates was startling.

Yet the actual number of premature deaths, as the Science Media group (and the authors themselves) pointed out, went from a really really really small number to just a really really small one. And more importantly, the group studiedthose already seeking help for infertilitywas not representative of the adults who have children without difficulty or those who opt for the child-free life.

Perhaps then it is time for a new tradition: the Fathers Day resolution, an annual promise dads everywhere should make to embrace the acuteness of the male condition, its fragility in modern life. After all, Fathers Day is the lone moment in the year that celebrates being, well, just a guy. Oh sure, the Super Bowl and all its macho imitators are commemorations of some repulsive male urge best ignored. But being a son or a father or both is its own glorious reward and, man, thats something worth celebrating.

Read more: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/14/does-fatherhood-make-men-healthier

Men Dont Realize The Sexual Dysfunction Risks Of Prostate Surgery

Reuters Health – Men with sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer surgery are often surprised to learn that the surgery had put them at risk for those problems, a new study finds.

The men in the study had come to a sexual health clinic because of problems they were having after removal of a cancerous prostate gland. Researchers who quizzed them about the sexual function information they had received preoperatively found that the men had “largely unrealistic expectations” about their sexual health after the surgery, like whether they’d be able to achieve erections.

“I think this data is some of the first to report what we see in the clinic,” said Dr. Joshua Meeks, a urologist affiliated with the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Men with prostate cancer have several treatment options, which include active surveillance, radiation and removing the gland altogether. All have potential side effects, according to senior study author Dr. John P. Mullhall and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

As reported in BJU International, Mulhall and colleagues surveyed 336 men with sexual dysfunction roughly three months after a prostate removal operation known as a radical prostatectomy. About two-thirds of the group had traditional open surgery; the rest had robotic-assisted surgery.

The average age was 64. Most of the men – about 88 percent of open surgery and 91 percent of robotic surgery patients – said they’d been able to have sex before surgery.

But only 38 percent knew whether they’d had nerve sparing surgery, which helps preserves sexual function. And only half of the patients realized the surgery would take away their ability to ejaculate.

Less than 10 percent knew their penis length might decrease after surgery.

Few men in either group were aware of the potential for changes in orgasms and pain or incontinence during orgasms.

The study didn’t analyze the information patients received from their doctors before the surgery, so the researchers can’t distinguish between what patients were told and what they remembered.

Still, the results show that some men may not retain information from their doctor about the risks of prostate removal, said Meeks, who was not involved with the new study.

“I think it really highlights why it’s important to have their spouse there, because I think having another set of ears is incredibly helpful,” he told Reuters Health.

Dr. Daniel Shoskes, a urologist at the Cleveland Clinic who also wasn’t involved in the study, told Reuters Health the conclusions fit with what his team has known for some time.

In fact, the Cleveland Clinic has started a half-day class for men undergoing prostate removal to educate them about the surgery and rehabilitation. The hope, said Shoskes, is that the classes will “have an impact on patient retention and satisfaction with the surgery.”

Shoskes, who also was not involved with the new research, added, “It is human and normal to forget what has been told to you. In some cases, it’s the surgeon that needs to do a better job” delivering the information.

The study’s lead author did not respond to a request for comment. In their paper, however, the study team also emphasizes the need to better prepare men for these operations. The study findings, they write, “should give us reason to think about our approach to the education of the patient prior to radical prostatectomy.”

Patients “are not remembering or appreciating the information the way that it is intended” and undertake the operation with mistaken expectations regarding their sexual health, they add.

SOURCE: bit.ly/1Ob43QJ BJU International, online December 21, 2015.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2016/01/07/side-effects-of-prostate-surgery_n_8930858.html

PROSTATE CANCER Early Symptoms and Effective Treatment

ENLARGED PROSTATE & ERECTILE PROBLEMS SPEED CURE IN A CAPSULE…

Combining The Nature’s Most Powerful Ingredients That Relieve Your Prostate Symptoms & Reignite Your Sexual Prowess In Only 6 Days…. All Without The Devastating Side Effects Of Drugs!prostate 2

Click Here To Learn More!

 

Prostate Cancer

Only men have a prostate. The prostate is a a small walnut-shaped exocrine gland of the male reproductive system, and located just below the bladder, in front of the rectum. It surrounds the urethra (the tube that carries urine and semen through the penis and out of the body) and produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. The fluid is essential to reproduction.

Prostate cancer, also known as carcinoma of the prostate, is the development of cancer in the prostate.Prostate cancer occurs when abnormal cells develop in the prostate. These abnormal cells can continue to multiply in an uncontrolled way and sometimes spread outside the prostate into nearby or distant parts of the body.Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas (cancers that begin in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids).
Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American.

Signs and symptoms of prostate cancer

Unfortunately,Prostate cancer may cause no signs or symptoms in its early stages.
When symptoms do exist, they are usually one or more of the following:

The patient A need to urinate frequently,
The patient gets up at night more often to urinate
Difficulty starting urination or holding back urine
weak flow Urination
There may be blood in the urine
Painful or burning urination
Ejaculation may be painful (less common)
Achieving or maintaining an erection may be difficult (less common).
Difficulty emptying the bladder completely.

These symptoms may not mean you have prostate cancer, but if you experience any of them, go and see your doctor.

If the prostate cancer is advanced the following symptoms are also possible:

Bone pain, often in the spine (vertebrae), pelvis, or ribs
The proximal part of the femur can be painful
Leg weakness (if cancer has spread to the spine and compressed the spinal cord)
Urinary incontinence (if cancer has spread to the spine and compressed the spinal cord)
Fecal incontinence (if cancer has spread to the spine and compressed the spinal cord).

Prostate cancer risk factorrs and causes

It's not clear what causes prostate cancer.

Older age. Your risk of prostate cancer increases as you age.
Family history of prostate or breast cancer.
Genetic Factor
Obesity.
Diet: There is some evidence to suggest that eating a lot of processed meat or food that is high in fat can increase the risk of developing prostate cancer.

Other risk factors for aggressive prostate cancer include:

Tall height
Lack of exercise and a sedentary lifestyle
High calcium intake
African-American race
Family history
Agent Orange exposure

Prostate Cancer Tests and diagnosis

Prostate screening tests might include:

Digital rectal exam (DRE).
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.

Diagnosing prostate cancer

Ultrasound.
Collecting a sample of prostate tissue.
If your tests show you may be at risk of prostate cancer, the next step is a biopsy. A biopsy is the only way a firm diagnosis of prostate cancer can be made.

Options for Prostate Cancer treatment may include:

Choosing the treatment that is right for you may be hard. Talk to your cancer doctor about the treatment options available for your type and stage of cancer. Your doctor can explain the risks and benefits of each treatment and their side effects.

Open prostatectomy (often with nerve-sparing techniques)
Minimally invasive laparoscopic robotic surgery
Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
Proton therapy
Brachytherapy
Cryotherapy
Molecular-targeted therapy
Vaccine therapy and gene therapy
Hormone therapy
Active surveillance
If your tests show you may be at risk of prostate cancer, the next step is a biopsy. A biopsy is the only way a firm diagnosis of prostate cancer can be made.

Signs, symptoms and treatments for prostate cancer – Dr. Sam Chawla

ENLARGED PROSTATE & ERECTILE PROBLEMS SPEED CURE IN A CAPSULE…

Combining The Nature’s Most Powerful Ingredients That Relieve Your Prostate Symptoms & Reignite Your Sexual Prowess In Only 6 Days…. All Without The Devastating Side Effects Of Drugs!prostate 2

Click Here To Learn More!

 

Dr. Sam Chawla with Wake Specialty Physicians — Urology discusses signs, symptoms and treatments for prostate cancer.

Prostate Cancer Symptoms, Tests and Treatment

ENLARGED PROSTATE & ERECTILE PROBLEMS SPEED CURE IN A CAPSULE…

Combining The Nature’s Most Powerful Ingredients That Relieve Your Prostate Symptoms & Reignite Your Sexual Prowess In Only 6 Days…. All Without The Devastating Side Effects Of Drugs!prostate 2

Click Here To Learn More!

 

Prostate Cancer Symptoms Tests and Treatment

cancer bph breast cancer skin cancer prostate cancer pancreatic cancer cervical cancer lung cancer colon cancer ovarian cancer pancreatic cancer symptoms chemotherapy ovarian cancer symptoms colon cancer symptoms thyroid cancer lung cancer symptoms throat cancer stomach cancer breast cancer symptoms brain tumor liver cancer bladder cancer symptoms of lung cancer prostate cancer symptoms breast cancer awareness bone cancer esophageal cancer cancer symptoms throat cancer symptoms uterine cancer radiation therapy symptoms of colon cancer bowel cancer symptoms of ovarian cancer cancer research kidney cancer brain cancer colorectal cancer prostrate tongue cancer oral cancer bone cancer symptoms blood cancer lymphoma cancer types of cancer liver cancer symptoms skin cancer symptoms skin cancer pictures symptoms of pancreatic cancer endometrial cancer symptoms of prostate cancer radiotherapy stage 4 cancer thyroid cancer symptoms cancer cell cancer treatment bladder cancer symptoms vulvar cancer brachytherapy brain ancer symptoms renal cell carcinoma breast cancer treatment cure for cancer metastatic cancer small cell lung cancer stage 4 lung cancer stages of cancer kidney cancer symptoms prostate cancer treatment signs of prostate cancer cancer cure lymph node cancer types of skin cancer causes of cancer gallbladder cancer national cancer institute prostatectomy lung cancer treatment metastatic breast cancer cancer centers of america

A Date with BPH – Prostate Enlargement Symptoms, Causes, Complications, Diagnosis

ENLARGED PROSTATE & ERECTILE PROBLEMS SPEED CURE IN A CAPSULE…

Combining The Nature’s Most Powerful Ingredients That Relieve Your Prostate Symptoms & Reignite Your Sexual Prowess In Only 6 Days…. All Without The Devastating Side Effects Of Drugs!prostate 2

Click Here To Learn More!

 

1) Providing Phytonutrient Nourishment – Years of stressful living caused damage to your body. To help address this, Ayurstate releases hundreds of phytonutrients that act at the molecular level to promote Prostate Health.

2) Increasing Soy Intake – Researchers believe that the increasing estrogen-to-testosterone ratio brought on by aging is one of the factors that adversely affects the size of the prostate gland. 2 ounces or more of soy in your daily diet will help decrease estrogen levels and restore proper estrogen-to-testosterone ratio that becomes skewed as men get into their 60s and beyond. Good sources of soy include tofu (soybean curd), miso, tempeh, roasted soy nuts, and soy flour or powder.

3) Increasing Selenium Intake – Selenium is essential for good prostate health. Selenium-rich foods include wheat germ, tuna, herring and other seafood and shellfish, beef liver and kidney, eggs, sunflower and sesame seeds, cashews, Brazil nuts, mushrooms, garlic, onions, and kelp.

4) Increasing Zinc Intake – 15 mg of zinc are needed daily for healthy prostate function. Pumpkin seed in the shell, oysters, beans, and nuts are excellent sources of zinc.

5) Minimizing Alcohol Consumption – Alcohol depletes both zinc and vitamin B6 (which is necessary for zinc absorption).

6) Eating Healthy – Eat lots of fruits and vegetables to get the necessary antioxidants in your diet. Avoid saturated fats, sugars and processed foods. High-fat foods like meats and dairy products can elevate testosterone level which stimulates prostate cell growth and enlargement.

7) Supplementing Diet – Take a daily multivitamin supplement which includes at least the following for supporting prostate health – Vitamin A (25,000 IU), Vitamin E (1,200 IU), and Lycopene (10 mg).

8) Improving Circulation – Perform Kegel exercises to improve blood flow to the prostate and urogenital tissues. Kegel exercises are done by pulling up all the muscles around the scrotum and anus, holding, and releasing. 10 repetitions of this movement, 5-6 times daily will maximize blood flow to your prostate gland.

9) Adopting Healthy Lifestyle – Get sufficient rest and exercise regularly. Regular exercise has been shown to strengthen the immune system and improve digestion, circulation, and the removal of waste matter from the body. Exercise also prevents obesity, which is a risk factor for many diseases, including cancer. Regular exercise may also reduce the risk of prostate gland enlargement.